Woody’s Smorgasburger V

Here’s a new thread for those of you discussing Woody’s.  The other ones are closed for further posting but you can still read what’s there.

62 Responses to Woody’s Smorgasburger V

  • Evan Zang says:

    Food! Food! Food! You have to absolutely ADORE this web site. Since the most current theme has been focused on the risks of consuming raw hamburger meat, I think it’s only fitting that I share this little story with you about cheeseburgers.

    Now, as Phil knows, these days I rarely eat red meat. I don’t eat pork. I also don’t eat fast food. There are many reasons for this, which I need not go into here, and will save it perhaps for another time. Still, I occasionally get an almost primitive and carnal craving for a big, juicy, cheeseburger, one in which I didn’t cook myself. Not Bison or chicken. Not Veggie. Just good old USDA ground beef, which I insist, must be grass fed, anti-biotic and hormone free.

    A year ago I was in Zinburger here in Scottsdale and ordered their classic cheeseburger, stipulating it “must be cooked to a temperature no less than 160 degrees” (medium to medium well). The waiter understood, and 15 minutes later showed up with a terrific looking cheeseburger, resplendent in Brioche buns, lettuce, fresh tomato, brined pickles and sweet onions. It was a Dinosaur sized burger, so I decided to neatly cut it in half, something I never do. But this time I’m glad I did.

    Although the outside of the burger was beautifully seared, the center was absolutely raw! Because I was late for a meeting, I didn’t make a fuss over the undercooked sandwich, and the nice people at Zinburger “comped” the raw burger, milkshake and side of fries. They were very apologetic. I figured it was an isolated incident. “Not to worry,” I said. “Sometimes it happens.”

    That episode was the first of many cheeseburgers of which, I would order over the next year.

    This became a self-propelled quest, a personal goal, to see if I could find a restaurant Chef anywhere that could properly cook a burger. Since I didn’t enjoy fast food, I only ate at hotels and restaurants while traveling. It didn’t seem to matter where I was – Arizona, California, Texas, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, New York, even in Hawaii. But no matter what restaurant or hotel I visited, whenever I ordered a medium to medium well cheeseburger, it consistently arrived rare or raw. In all cases, the burger was nicely “seared” on the outside, but cold and uncooked in the center. My “discovery” had also taught me a vital lesson: When dining out, you can’t always determine the “doneness” of a hamburger by how it appears on the outside. You must inspect the inside too, which is easily done by first cutting the burger in half

    Another time, while staying at The Venetian in Las Vegas, around 10 PM, I ordered a well done cheeseburger and fries through room service. I figured by ordering a well done burger, even undercooked, it would still arrive at a very respectable medium. About 90 long minutes later my food arrived. While the room service attendant was still in my room (waiting for his tip no doubt) I cut into the gigantic cheeseburger, gently sawing it in half. As I did so I remember thinking how hungry I was at the time, silently praying it would be cooked correctly, but knowing it most likely would be a bit underdone. I wasn’t disappointed. The burger was seared very nicely on the outside, but the inside was so rare it looked like it hadn’t seen any heat. (Note: A room service cheeseburger, fries, and a Diet Coke at The Venetian will run you $36.50 with tip and service charge. A blatant rip off, of course).

    I half-heartedly thanked the attendant, handed him a few dollars, then, grabbing the food tray, I asked him to show me to the hotel’s kitchen. Together, we awkwardly rode the elevator down to the first floor where the attendant nervously ushered me to the main kitchen area behind the dining room. At that time of night the kitchen wasn’t very busy (making me wonder why it took so damn long for them to produce such a simple order). I spotted the heavy set Chef who was casually smoking a very long cigarette, talking to a bleary-eyed waitress.

    “Chef,” I said, holding the tray out to him. “You’re going to f*****g kill somebody serving up s**t like this!”

    The Chef nonchalantly took the tray from me and laid it on the counter. He intently inspected the hamburger, pulling off pieces of meat from different sections. “Yep,” he said, frowning. “This burger is raw. Sir, I apologize. Please let me make this again, but cooked more well done this time.”

    I declined, telling him it was late and I’d lost my appetite. He made a few more conciliatory gestures but I was already out the door and headed back to my room. “To Hell with it,” I thought. I’ll show them! I’d go to bed hungry!

    I raided the room’s minibar for $43.45 around 1 AM.

    My point here is that I learned early on at Woody’s that the only way to properly “test” the doneness of a hamburger is to press down on it with either your finger, or, a spatula. If the meat has a lot of “play,” it’s rare. If the meat resists enough, it’s ready to be served. I was a teenager when I learned this thanks to Ralph Wood and his Alpine-themed hamburger joint. The hotel and restaurant Chefs I encountered apparently hadn’t encountered this simple little trick, incorrectly relying on the “seared” outside of a burger as an indicator of its doneness. As everyone knows, most restaurants and hotel restaurants now state on their menus that “consuming raw or under cooked food can make you [sick,]” and it’s just as dangerous if you’re pregnant. Moreover, all fast food restaurants are required to cook hamburgers to an internal temperature of 160 degrees, medium, or more. It’s not a law. They’re simply trying to minimize their exposure to litigation from customers who got sick or died from consuming undercooked food.

    So, at this point, if you’re still reading this, you must be asking yourself: “Dude, if you knew the probability of getting a properly cooked hamburger was non-existent, why did you continue to order cheeseburgers?” I can only say it was a quest, a personal experiment, an attempt to see if it would be possible to order and receive a properly cooked burger.

    It’s a crap shoot. And at least for now, a year later, it doesn’t look like it’s going to happen anytime soon.

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68) says:

    ~ My last crap shoot for today ~

    For our dinner this evening, my wife and I prepared a new recipe for baked chicken nuggets. The fresh chicken breasts were cut into one inch nuggets , then soaked ( not marinated ) in Buffalo sauce. Next the nuggets were rolled in a mixture of bread crumbs , seasoning and Parmesan cheese.
    The pieces then were placed on a cookie sheet and into the oven @ 400 degrees for 25 minutes.

    This all was a crap shoot because I myself am not a fan of hot sauces.
    The results: Mary Ann rated the entrée at 4 stars out of five while I am posting a 2 1/2 stars. I much prefer the Montgomery Inn BBQ sauce. I already know there is another crap shoot awaiting my attention for tomorrow, but I won’t say what that is now.

    Phil A.

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68) says:

    ~ The Costco crap shoot ~

    The Skinny Pop brand is sold at all Costco stores, all year long.
    The popcorn is featured in TWO flavors; Regular and White Cheddar.

    The crap shoot is ; On my next visit, will I find both flavors OR just one,
    and not the other ?

    Phil A.

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68) says:

    ~ The Monday night crap shoot in Culver City ~

    Although all the Woody’s units ran the Hamburger Steak ~ 99 cent special,
    the Culver city store was the only one where it was exceptionally popular.
    Customers would order their dinners by specifying how well done they wanted their 10 oz. hamburger patty cooked ; R, MR, M, or W.

    The grill master ( usually Ty or Randy ) , had two jobs to perform at once.
    1) To give each monster beef patty enough grill time to cook adequately.
    2) To control the roaring flames leaping to the exhaust hood.
    Over the years I have come to realize that the Woody’s procedure did NOT allow for ” resting time ” prior to plating the grilled patty.
    Another big BOO BOO was that the patties were still chilled as they were placed on the grill. ( coming directly from the refrigerator ).

    Of course I can hear folks out there say; ” what the hell Phil, Woody’s was just a corner burger joint ! “. True enough, but customers were getting a hell of a lot of undercooked patties which were returned at the side bar for more cook time. If the grill was still loaded, the returned patty was put in the micro wave
    for a minute or two. Otherwise, it got more time on the side of grill.

    So, this was the customer’s crap shoot : Regardless of how I ordered, will my Hamburger Steak Dinner be cooked somewhat within the edible range or do I have to send it back ?

    I must conclude by saying ; ” God bless Ty and Randy for even showing up for work on Monday nights. ” No matter what age now, all the ex Culver City guys
    will never forget those leaping broiler flames and overflowing grease traps.
    Phil A.

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68) says:

    ~ Yucaipa ?? ~

    Sandy,

    I did visit your ebay site and noticed your hometown name which I had
    not recognized. I used the Google map site and discovered what a pretty
    area you live in. I myself own sufficient Woody’s stuff, but I still enjoy perusing the Ebay site in case something different shows up. Such fun !

  • mark husar says:

    Phil,

    Turning 70 is a crapshoot!

  • sandy murray says:

    So I am a Woody’s Redondo girl (I was little, ok…makes me REALLY young still ;>). This was a special treat for me, not a regular destination — eating out as a whole just not done. But this blog…wow. Nice memories (less of the burgers than the ice cream pile-ons…again, i was a kid). And there are a few other “left behind” restaurants I’m enjoying bits on here…Helms…the trucks, the bakery tray pulled out…see the common thread here: SWEETS!). Thanks for this site!

    Wanted to throw out there that I have a coffee mug from Woody’s up on Ebay (heavy duty, Shenango restaurant ware) that I am letting go of — along with a lot of old things. So if anyone wants to relive memories every morning, have a look under seller berdoosbest for Woody’s Smorgasburger Coffee Mug.

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68) says:

    ~ The giant crap shoots ~ ( instigated by Evan Zang )

    I was hoping Evan would return here with the ” medical / health ” view of this raw meat entrée. And I see he did not disappoint. Facts are facts…. Thank you.
    I remember well the Friday afternoons at Woody’s when the Patman Meats truck arrived. The driver would back that big 24 footer right up to the back door and then proceed to wheel in the endless baskets of ground beef patties.
    This Friday delivery would tide us over until the next Monday morning.

    The hamburger patties were formed just 12 hours earlier at the plant and then packed in 20 lb. wire baskets. Those fresh patties looked so beautiful with their pinkish/red color. Any fans of the Steak Tartare would have gone nuts.

    Ever since I turned 70, it seems a lot of things have turned into a giant crap shoot. Even opening a new savings account at the local bank or taking your ride in for a new radiator or getting your ice maker fixed…. all a crap shoot.
    Same with the prescribed Rx scenario : Chances are that the side effects will be much worse than the original malady. Yet another crap shoot, and a big one.

    So, back in 1955, we have Charles Cramer and his nephew Ralph Wood rolling the dice as to whether or not they should proceed with plans for the new burger joint featuring a Tyrolean theme ….. but no French fries !

    My last crap shoot for today : As I sit down at my favorite diner, I notice there is only one cook on duty and I immediately wonder ; will my French Toast arrive hot or cold ?

    Phil A.

  • Evan Zang says:

    HI Phil! The French and Germans call this raw dish “Steak Tartare,” which, is essentially raw hamburger typically mixed with onion and various spices. Long ago it was served with “sauce tartare,” hence the name. My wife, who is German, loves the stuff. Not me. Unless you totally trust your butcher (or the restaurant), consuming raw hamburger is a giant crap shoot. There are several species of E. Coli bacteria that live in the guts of animals, and most of them are harmless. However, some, like E. Coli 0157:H7, produces a ztoxin that can penetrate the human intestine and enter the bloodstream. It then proceeds to destroy red blood cells and may eventually cause more problems including kidney failure. Hamburger cooking times and temperatures vary by restaurant, however, most fast food hamburger chains almost universally cook hamburger meat to a temperature of 160 degrees F, thus destroying harmful bacteria and toxins. And I haven’t even begun to discuss what happens when the kitchen staff neglects to properly wash their hands after using the bathroom. Let’s not go there now . . . Whew! What a can of worms. (No, did I just say that?)

  • Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos (NM) says:

    Mark….Thanks for your remembrances! Glad my mind is not making too many things up!!! e.g. the entry!

    Whoa, can’t remember if I asked before: Once the surf was up and Guests started coming in, I’m thinking it was a bit noisy along The Line. However, was there some kind of Musak in the dining room?

    Phil A: “As for rare burgers….how about the French who love it raw!….Take your G-Ma’s meatloaf recipe and slap it in a bun.!”
    Oooeee….Maybe along PCH, but never UP in PV! My Hermosa future Father-in-Law, loved to fine dine and especially Scandia’s on Sunset Strip (see herein) where, because of the many of Y’all being in “management” must’ve went too, his FAV was a mound of what appeared to be “hamburger” meat with a dimple on top filled with the yoke of an egg…Voila Mes Amies —> “Steak Tartare!” Typically served….bare naked, as they say http://tinyurl.com/y8g9468x Nope, never dared do a version…LOL! HOWEVER! within the past 10 years, went off track one night by failing to closely read what a plate of Carpaccio was all about! Apparently I was so excited to see a reference to my favorite classical piece and didn’t take into account my touch of dyslexia to see http://tinyurl.com/jcp2xz3 that they were not the same!!!! Whoa! Paper thin slices of raw filet drizzled with EVO and “seasoned” with capers! (Google Image search: Carpaccio/EVO/Capers OMG…If ya never dared go raw…i.e. I’m not into non veggie Sushi….., anyone do it as YOLO and let us know!

    Nope, no pancakes Sunday…Daughter/Fam will do me up some Crab Legs!!!
    Best Wishes to All as well!

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68) says:

    ~ Who ordered these pancakes ? ~

    Evan pressed some interesting buttons on his recent posting.
    I am most anxious to learn which choices IHOB will make regarding the menu items, and their pricing and quality.
    If the waitress system is maintained, that will tack on 15% to the bill plus the usual extra wait time to get service. Not good on both counts.

    I think their best shot is to mimic the Wendy’s dine in operation …….but what do I know ? When I learned of the business model at the new Rock and Brew in Redondo, I torched the place saying it would close in three months. Hah !

    We really enjoy the breakfast outings. Ninety percent of the time I order French Toast with 2 bacon strips and 2 links sausage. The remaining 10% goes to Blueberry pancakes ! I do NOT attempt to make French Toast at home
    only because I can then reserve the item to be a special treat when going out.

    In the early 1970’s , Ralph Wood admitted his business model was no longer sustainable. ( except El Segundo ) He said that early on, he pretty much had a lock on his targeted customers …… until Mac’s and the Big Boy showed up.
    So, you turn the page and move on.

    As for the rare burgers …… how about the French who love it raw !
    They have a special name for it but I forget what the hell it is.
    I have a friend who feasts on a similar recipe. Basically, you take your grandmothers meatloaf recipe , mix it all up and then slap it in a bun without
    one bit of cooking. His family calls it the Cannibal Sandwich !
    Not in this lifetime my friends ……….

    Happy Fathers Day to all you guys !
    How many are going out for Pancakes on Sunday ?
    Phil A.

  • mark husar says:

    hil A.

    Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos (NM) says:
    June 11, 2018 at 2:35 pm
    Wow…a cig machine? That engenders all sorts of imaginings. Can’t remember: at Redondo, was there a back door to come into the kitchen area when coming on shift and was that always left unlocked or were we buzzed in?
    Comment by mark h.:
    As memory serves me, we did not use the back door when I came to work. As we would enter the front door, turn right and walk along the burger condiment shelf. As you came to the ice cream condiment shelf, you would gaze at the unsightly mess of toppings all over the place. (Little fuzzy on the ice cream topping shelf) Turn right and meander past the ice cream machine on the left, move past the register on the right. A few more steps and you were at the entrance to the bathrooms on the left. Then thru the swinging doors to the dish washing area on the left. Directly to the right, the managers cubicle and the cork board on the wall with……….
    The work schedules!
    I do not recall any cigarette machine in the dining area. At that time I was smoking Marlboro in the box and would have bought them if we had the machine there. As it was, I bought my smokes from the gas station at PCH and Ave B. (gas was $0.22 per gallon as I recall) I drove a Honda 160 that I could fill up for fifty cents!!
    The back door was not locked during the times I was working.

    If not, did we come in the front entrance where there might have been an 87% chance there was a machine or might I have only seen that when stacking the red trays at the beginning of the red counter which had elevated, narrow strips so trays ‘floated’ along to prevent a worn appearance? Were there ever or always paper place mats on the trays? Who put them there? Were those aluminim strips at CC where I’m pretty sure the back door was always open, except for a screen door…i.e. I can’t recall ever using the front entrance where there might have been a cig machine.

    Was there a box of Woody’s matches kept atop the cig machine or were they under the counter by the cash register? Did ya have to be a certain age to be given a book of matches?

    Bottom line? I’m saying Redondo had one in that dark paneled entrance area given that ‘machines’ were in most businesses. Picture me this: you opened a glass door; ya took a couple of steps and then ya turned right into a not tiny, but not big area. That “area” might have served for Folks to do a Disney snake line on a Monday Hamburger Special nite…otherwise people just snaked along the wall. Once you got your salad: wasn’t there some kind of partition separating you from that area? I.e. you were kinda in between it and the grill glass before things opened back up again when ya got to the Drink Man?

    Alas, I don’t remember condom dispensers in the rest room(s). Were there feminine hygiene pads/napkins in the Gals room and discreet disposal containers for them?

    Comment from Mark H.: I don’t remember a condom dispenser.

    Anybody have any embarrassing moments using the microphone which was by the register. Always enjoyed the ‘What the Eh!?’ expression on a Chica who was amazed us Register Guys knew the order by the Magic Order Writer the Salad Man used for the GrillMan. Speaking of Chicas, did there ever come a time when Stringed/Flossied Chicas had to cover up?

    BTW: how many NewsPapers-on-a-Pole were there: LA Times; Wall Street Journal; Daily Breeze; ???? or just multiples of each? Psst: USA Today didn’t come out till ’82.
    I can’t see napkin dispensers on each table. Were they just on the condiment counters?
    Comment:Don’t remember,,,but I recall faintly there were 3 items on each table…S/P shaker and an ash tray!!

    And S/P shakers on each table?
    Comment: Yes, they were glass.

    Glass/plastic? Was there one on the condiment counter?

  • Evan Zang says:

    Phil, Bob, Mark, and Anyone reading this:

    Strangely, I can understand why iHop and other financially stricken chain locations are looking to offer something different. Who eats pancakes anymore in a restaurant? The last time I ate in a place similar to a Waffle House or iHop was 35 years ago, in Edmonton, Canada, and then only because that was the only place to get something to eat on a very bitter, freezing cold weekend. (Side note: I ordered fish and chips and a cold Labatt Blue, mainly because that seemed to be what all the Canadian truckers were ordering at the counter).

    Sadly, the brain trust at iHop are chasing a trend that has probably already peaked, in my opinion. They’re about 10 years too late. Next stop in the Foodie World: Fermented Vegetables. (I know, this does not sound as mouth watering as a dry-aged steak, but fermented vegetables and herbs are a steadily growing item in the global epicure market).

    I had my last Woody’s hamburger at the El Segundo location before it too was finally shuttered. Woodys produced the best hamburger I had ever eaten. Ralph Wood had it right. The genius was in the simplicity. Burgers weren’t meant to share a bun with bacon, salsa, avocado, or sprouts. It’s all about the meat, bun, lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles, and a little mayo or thousand island. The meat speaks for itself. Everything else is merely support.

    Chef Chris Kronner offers “burger wisdom” in his outstanding book, “A Burger to Believe In.” Kronner isn’t a household name yet, but he will be soon. The man has cooked and eaten thousands of hamburgers. I admire his recipes, except, darn it, he insists on serving up burgers on the “rare” side. Thats not for me. About 25 years ago I had some very rare meat while in London and I almost didn’t make it back to the USA. Although Internet decorum won’t allow me to go into specific detail, on a more positive note, I did lose about 12 pounds!

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68) says:

    ~ Burger wars in the offing ? ~

    IHOP switching to IHOB ……
    How about KFC to Kentucky Fried Burgers ?

    As for myself, I am making plans for ” La Loca Hamburguesa ” here in Dublin.
    What would Charles Cramer say ? ( Woody’s uncle )
    Phil A.

  • Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos (NM) says:

    Wow…a cig machine? That engenders all sorts of imaginings. Can’t remember: at Redondo, was there a back door to come into the kitchen area when coming on shift and was that always left unlocked or were we buzzed in? If not, did we come in the front entrance where there might have been an 87% chance there was a machine or might I have only seen that when stacking the red trays at the beginning of the red counter which had elevated, narrow strips so trays ‘floated’ along to prevent a worn appearance? Were there ever or always paper place mats on the trays? Who put them there? Were those aluminim strips at CC where I’m pretty sure the back door was always open, except for a screen door…i.e. I can’t recall ever using the front entrance where there might have been a cig machine.

    Was there a box of Woody’s matches kept atop the cig machine or were they under the counter by the cash register? Did ya have to be a certain age to be given a book of matches?

    Bottom line? I’m saying Redondo had one in that dark paneled entrance area given that ‘machines’ were in most businesses. Picture me this: you opened a glass door; ya took a couple of steps and then ya turned right into a not tiny, but not big area. That “area” might have served for Folks to do a Disney snake line on a Monday Hamburger Special nite…otherwise people just snaked along the wall. Once you got your salad: wasn’t there some kind of partition separating you from that area? I.e. you were kinda in between it and the grill glass before things opened back up again when ya got to the Drink Man?

    Alas, I don’t remember condom dispensers in the rest room(s). Were there feminine hygiene pads/napkins in the Gals room and discreet disposal containers for them?

    Anybody have any embarrassing moments using the microphone which was by the register. Always enjoyed the ‘What the Eh!?’ expression on a Chica who was amazed us Register Guys knew the order by the Magic Order Writer the Salad Man used for the GrillMan. Speaking of Chicas, did there ever come a time when Stringed/Flossied Chicas had to cover up?

    BTW: how many NewsPapers-on-a-Pole were there: LA Times; Wall Street Journal; Daily Breeze; ???? or just multiples of each? Psst: USA Today didn’t come out till ’82.
    I can’t see napkin dispensers on each table. Were they just on the condiment counters?
    And S/P shakers on each table? Glass/plastic? Was there one on the condiment counter?

  • Phil Thomas says:

    Phil A– Between 1959 and 1961 I don’t recall there ever being a cigarette machine at the Culver City location, but of course that might just be another thing that has faded from my memory.

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68) says:

    ~ Drive thru dairy ~

    Hi Mark H.

    I for one recall the dairy …. but not the name. I was never a patron
    there so I cannot say if the place had a beer and wine license as well.
    Suppose bread and cigarettes were sold too.

    I am now wondering if the Woody units had cigarette machines.
    This may be the very first Woody issue that has be stumped as I do not remember the machines placement nor guys coming in to reload the cigs.
    Who can help ?
    Phil A.

  • Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos (NM) says:

    Yo Mark…Thanks for being so UpFront!
    “The business that I was drawing reference to was a drive thru dairy!! Spark any memory?”
    Yo Mark…sorry, don’t remember any drive-thru dairy, but I only lived in the South Bay less than a year!
    “My superiors often commented that the reason I was so good as a Peace Officer was because I was able to think like them!!”
    Alas, I remember some things I did as a “kid” that were done impulsively or as a “goof” that I blush at! Be that as is may, one of the things that “made it” working at Woody’s…if only for 9-10 months…was the good Guys that were hired in my time. Bravo for where/what/who you moved on to!
    Elsewise, and not wishing to engender any political differences or umbrage amongst the readership, I think you are clueing us in to the psychodynamics of a certain Politico’s success nowadays! LOL

  • mark husar says:

    Bob….
    Your response of May 21.

    Believe me, I was well into delinquent life by that time. Pretty close to being a full on ner-do-well!! However, being so close to the line separating the good guys from the bad guys was a blessing in disguise. My superiors often commented that the reason I was so good as a Peace Officer was because I was able to think like them!!

    The business that I was drawing reference to was a drive thru dairy!! Spark any memory?

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68) says:

    ~ Who cares ? ~

    IHOP is changing it’s name and logo to IHOb .
    I think it means Intenational House of Brands. ~

    Ralph Wood and partner Charles Cramer had a five year relationship
    with IHOP during the years 1962 thru 1967. It was a failed deal from the very start for so many reasons. The biggest reason was that the guys who bought a franchise were cheated because all incurred costs were grossly inflated.
    Leasing agreements, franchise fees, equipment costs , and food supplies were so inflated that no $$$$ made it to the bottom line for the operator.

    I was told by a lawyer for IHOP that the IHOP legal department took up the most square footage at the main office. Al L. and his brother should have been in jail. The Int. House of Lawsuits would have been a more honest name.

    Phil A.

  • Phil Ankofski(64~68) says:

    ~ Woody’s Mac & Cheese ~

    For all the ex Woody’s guys : Man, did we miss the boat on this menu item.
    I was treating my wife to lunch at our favorite B B Q joint where I selected the mac and cheese for my side item.
    This was Cheddar cheese smothering nice size noodles. But, what made it really great is that it is served warm. WOW ! This may sound like the first time I had warm M&C ….. No, it is not. But, it is the first time I thought back and compared it to the Woody’s cold offering.

    Yes, it would have taken such little effort and space to have a warming element under the Woody’s M&C. In fact we could have tossed out the slow selling soups and used that existing serving unit. Wa la !
    Boy, would I love to rerun those monthly manager meetings now…… I would be a real pain in the ass.

    Phil A.

  • Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos (NM) says:

    HA HA, Apparently The Brothers where I went to high school ‘back east’ were not divinely prescient as they favored French over Spanish as a required “second” language…in addition to Latin. As such, I accepted, oh so naively, my future Bro-in-Law’s translation of El Segundo (living down in Hermosa) as meaning The Big Stink. Eh! As ‘The Second’ bore no “cognatish” resemblance to Le Deuxième, I accepsted that. Say hey: what is The Second having to do with anything anyway…of what?
    Be that as it may, lest Y’all don’t know what Sepulveda is all about, please do a Google Search. I would have joined Woody at the meeting to remain unPC!
    (RE Today: God Bless all those who risked their lives on this, the 74th anniversary of D-Day so long ago, including my Uncle, who survived and made it to Berlin with a target on his back http://tinyurl.com/yb4s9sdm.)

  • Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos (NM) says:

    Alas and back in the day: was this the signage http://tinyurl.com/y8sghfp6 the reality in Redondo where KISS’ Rock n Brews is on Woody’s footprint?

    HA HA, Apparently The Brothers where I went to high school ‘back east’ were not divinely prescient as they favored French over Spanish as a required “second” language…in addition to Latin. As such, I accepted, oh so naively, my future Bro-in-Law’s translation of El Segundo (living down in Hermosa) as meaning The Big Stink. Eh! As ‘The Second’ bore no “cognatish” resemblance to Le Deuxième, I accepsted that. Say hey: what is The Second having to do with anything anyway…of what?
    Be that as it may, lest Y’all don’t know what Sepulveda is all about, please do a Google Search. I would have joined Woody at the meeting to remain unPC!
    (RE Today: God Bless all those who risked their lives on this, the 74th anniversary of D-Day so long ago, including my Uncle, who survived and made it to Berlin with a target on his back http://tinyurl.com/yb4s9sdm.)

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68) says:

    ~ The city of El Segundo says goodbye to Sepulveda Blvd ~

    What would Ralph Wood think ?

    The city is changing out the S.B. road signs this week in favor of PCH signs
    for a two mile stretch through town. The thinking was to lend an air that hey, El Segundo is a fun beach town too. NOT !
    Oh sure …… with the Hyperion Waste Treatment Facility and the old steam plant looking over a touristy RV site will surely get you on the best beach list.
    The vacationing RVers don’t know any better and I am sure most inlanders are not aware of the stink plant either.
    ( folks in Torrance, Inglewood, Brentwood, etc. )

    Back to Mr. Wood ~ His #7 store did a nice business at 755 N. Sepulveda Blvd.
    for over four decades. The first eight years were his and he never changed a thing. Menus , uniforms, dining room, condiments, and on and on. SAME !
    Even the aloof GM remained the same. No sir…. Woody would have been at those council meetings to tell those SOBs to go to hell. “Sepulveda stays.”

    Phil A.

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68 says:

    ~ Remembering Chick Lambert with his dog ” Storm ” ~

    During my afternoon naps, I have lamented that Ralph Wood did not pick up on TV advertising to promote his SmorgasBurgers. He instead invested big bucks for HUGE rotating signs at three of the Woody’s locations.
    The pilots coming into LAX used them as beacons at night.

    Besides Chick, Ralph Williams and Cal Worthington were always in your face showing off the latest car wrecks that just arrived on their lots.
    Like the guys above, Mr. Wood and Don Steinke could have pitched burgers in the same way, standing at the grill ……. but without the dog I guess.

    ” Hi folks , Ralph Wood here. Why not stop in your nearby Woody’s SmorgasBurger location and treat your family to the juiciest burgers in LA.”
    ” And remember, like Cassell’s , you put on the fixing’s”.

    ……… Ralph could have placed a dog resting by the fireplace !

    Just some hilarity for EZ.
    Phil A.

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68 ) says:

    ~ the days of the REAL charcoal broiler ~

    Phil T. ~ Thank you so much for your informative narrative on how the charcoal was handled at Culver City. After five years here , I have finally learned
    what was involved with the specific procedures. It sounds like the method was safe enough as I never heard of anyone getting burned.
    Phil A.

  • Phil Thomas says:

    Nostalgic– It was fun to read that you also ran into that “Soup or salad?” vs. “Salad or soup?” thing. As I commented in Part IV, I was one of those guilty of that, but was finally able to make the switch to the preferred and less confusing way of asking the question.

    Phil A.– good point you make about the relatively few orders we’d get for the Matterhorn. I can’t remember if photos or images were posted for any of the offerings, but it seems that there must have been (?). I would think that the Matterhorn, which was a beautiful looking creation, should have been the centerpiece of the menu. The name alone was a perfect fit for the image Woody’s wanted to convey. Ah yes, the ideal combination: a Matterhorn and an Alpine shake. Oh, and I think I must have gotten a few more orders for them than you (Phil A.) did… maybe one or two per every dinner hour “rush.” But even that was not much in comparison to how many of the other burgers we sold.

    Since the switch from charcoal to gas happened during my tenure at the Culver City location (1959/1961) I suspect that most of you missed out on that. Seems like there must have been some financial consideration behind the decision to do that and I’d sure like to know what all of that charcoal cost them each month. And even though I wasn’t paying for it out of my own pocket, I do remember trying not to waste more charcoal than necessary. That was always tricky as the closing time approached. You wanted the coals to die down as much as possible, keeping just enough of it going to handle the few last minute orders you might get. One thing that would always start me mumbling profanities under my breath would be those very rare occasions when a half dozen cars would roll into the parking lot at the last minute. Where the #*@*& were they all coming from? Some party or ball game? Was each car packed with ten people? There might be only enough hot coals left to do a few burgers at a time. But like I say, that was very rare and I honestly can’t remember how we handled such situations. Must have always worked out okay.

    I’ve gotta say that I did have mixed feelings about the switch to gas. Yeah, it did make things a lot simpler and easier. I liked that. But at the same time it felt as though a learned skill was being taken away. You know, how someone in a factory must feel when they’re replaced by a robot. It took a while to “master” the art of cooking with charcoal, waiting as long as possible to get the coals up to full capacity in order to handle the dinner rush, then occasionally raking them to the right and adding a new line of charcoal along the left edge. That was the method. You never just scattered the new charcoal over the existing hot ones. It was almost like a conveyor belt where the dead and dying coals at the extreme right side (becoming ash by that time) would have to be scooped out into a metal bucket and the rest of the hot ones raked over to take their place. Since the grill had to be pulled out for that to happen, it would also be the time to add the new line of charcoal at the left. Seems like the process only had to be done a few times during the rush hour, but there again, my memory is fuzzy on the details.

  • Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos (NM) says:

    LOL Mark H., tho I shouldn’t be reinforcing your deliquency…LOL
    Elsewise, I’m blank about a business, let alone sign, to the right of where Woody’s sat…as seen here … http://tinyurl.com/y8tsvudo… that is the now the completely reconstructed building housing KISS’s Rock & Brew. Now? some apartment complex apparently sets/sits upon that target?
    Speaking of nearby businesses: I mentioned this before…I used to walk across Del Mar and use the back door into the 31 Flavors to get a ‘thin’ shake of coffee ice cream/milk/coffee syrup to have with my K-Bob back in Woody’s kitchen. Be that as it may, it continues to amaze me to see that such a simple venture as Baskin-Robbins is still there since at least ’62-’63! As Mark E’s blog system doesn’t allow too many links: Please use Google Maps; type in “Baskin Robbins avenue I Redondo CA”. Click on the pics that appear on the Left….hopefully you will see the ‘strip mall’ with BR-31 Flavors!
    (For younger readers: “telephone booth”? We didn’t have cell phones back in the day. Besides phones at home, there were these tiny ‘houses’ http://tinyurl.com/y96xrssy the phone company put up hither and yon, whereby putting coins in a slot, you could hold a speeking/listening thingy and by a system of wires your voice could be heard by a person with a special number who had a stationary phone in their home/business to which the wires hooked. Ya, it sounds mystical, but not more so than how your voice, passes invisibly through the air alone, to be heard across the world by just another person!!!

  • Evan Zang says:

    Phil is your new song written in the key of C? Does it have a bridge? Are you going to “tour” with a band?

  • Phil Ankofski (64~68 ) says:

    ~ No History today guys … just some Hilarity ~

    Our own Evan Zang is a very talented songwriter and he has inspired
    me to give it a try. This little ditty is sung to the old Thrifty Drug store music.

    ~ Have a Root Beer in a stein …..
    eat at Woody’s all the time.
    Enjoy a burger and much more …..
    at your Woody’s fun store.

    Well Evan ????
    Phil A.

  • mark husar says:

    Another closing story and trivia question at the end….

    The Woodys, Redondo Beach had been closed for the evening. Bunch of guys hangin’ out in the parking lot just shooting the breeze, talking girls and cars. Or maybe cars and girls!!
    I remember a 68 vw, lotus europa, GTO, a 57 ford and a station wagon in the parking lot.
    Near the entry door, there was some kind of tree growing that dropped seeds the size of walnut. I thought to myself, as I picked a few up and took a closer look at them, that they were the perfect size for throwing at the sign outside the business adjacent to the parking lot.
    It took a few tries, but I finally hit that sign with one of the pods.
    There was a fella strolling by who witnessed me throwing that pod, and he meandered down to the telephone both near the street on the West side of the parking lot.
    My brother looked at me and said, ” I don’t like the looks of things. Lets get you outta here”. So we got in his bug and headed for home.

    Good thing we did!!!

    Jim dropped me off at home and went back to Woodys to hang out. Atthe restaurant, there was a parking lot full of cops looking for the kid who had thrown the seed pod at the sign. It turns out that the fella in the phone booth was a detective, and he had called in for some patrol officers to come down and give me some grief. I am sure a ride to the station and a few hours in jail were on the list for me. Maybe cure me of my budding life of crime!!
    Nobody said a word and eventually thecops all went about theirbusiness.

    TRIVIA:
    What was the name of the business whose sign was beaned by the seed pod I threw??

  • Phil Thomas says:

    It’s sure nice reading about all of your memories in context with Phil A’s reminder that as things changed over the years (such as the menu offerings) it can be confusing to some of the really old timers like me… 1959-1961. But please don’t stop talking about the more recent things since it’s good to hear about the way things changed over time.

    So, hear’s another one for Phil A. Do you know when the fish sandwiches and melted cheese were introduced? The reason I ask is that they represent a couple other things that are fuzzy or missing in my memory. I want to say that I can remember them but I honestly can’t. After a very long time working as the backup man followed by the occasional assignments to the other stations (with the exception of the cash register which I avoided like the plague) I worked the grill a lot. That’s probably due in part to the fact that one of the employees (Jacque [spelling?] the French or maybe French Canadian guy who I mentioned some time ago) and who was really good on the grill and more or less claimed it as HIS spot, either transferred, quit or started working shifts that differed from mine. Anyway, at some point I saw less of him and found myself working that position more and more frequently. Seems that I’d remember fish sans and grilled cheese, but I can’t. I’m trying to visualize just how I’d do a grilled cheese on a grill as opposed to a smooth, flat surface. Hmmm, guess I’d take a toasted burger bun, add two (?) slices of cheese and then place it back on the grill, but not directly over the flame until the cheese melted. But could the Radar Range have been used? Yuk. I know what a chewy disaster the microwave makes out of bread and rolls. Can’t imagine that we used that method. But yet, I can almost see myself popping the toasted burger bun with the unmelted cheese slices into the Radar Range for five-seconds.

  • Phil Ankofski ( 1964 ~ 1968 ) says:

    ~ Bob Anderson @ Woody’s El Segundo X 2 ~

    Bob’s first stint with Woody’s began in 1964 as a crew member.
    He won promotions in subsequent years and attained the area manager
    designation in 1969. In mid 1971 , Bob separated from Woody’s due to
    the closing of most of the stores.

    Bob then sold insurance for a number of years, then relocated to become a carpenter in Las Vegas during the building boom there.
    At some point in the late 1980’s , Bob returned to the South Bay area
    and was rehired at the same Woody’s ES as manager. ( second stint ).
    I reconnected with Bob in 1991 during a vacation visit to LA.
    He filled me in on all that had transpired over the past 20 years.

    Around 1993, Bob suffered an on the job medical injury which forced him
    off the job under Workman’s Comp. rules. I have since lost contact.
    Bob and I worked together in 1966/67. He was so well liked by all our coworkers and customers. We did manage several social events outside of work, but our work schedules did not allow for much. I always wished we could have been better friends.
    I hope all is well with you Bob.

    Phil A.

  • Phil Ankofski ~ 1964 CC#1 ~ ES #7 ~ RB #2 1968 ~ says:

    ~ Question ~

    Why did Ralph Wood spend a huge sum of $$$$$$ on three HUGE
    road signs in 1966 instead of some TV advertising like Felix Chevrolet ?
    Phil A.

  • Phil Ankofski ~ 1964 CC#1 ~ ES #7 ~ RB #2 1968 ~ says:

    ~ several real slow sellers ~

    The slow selling fish sandwich ( FS) and the Melted Cheese (MC) still outsold the gorgeous Matterhorn. In my four year tenure, I did not make more
    than THREE Matterhorns. They could have done better with some graphics at the front door.
    Phil A.

  • Phil Ankofski ~ 1964 CC#1 ~ ES #7 ~ RB #2 1968 ~ says:

    ~ Soups on ~

    Two more flavors of soup at Woody’s : Bean and a Split Pea.
    There may have been an extra creamy Tomato as well.
    I was not a soup fan back then ……. but I sure am now.
    Phil .

  • Phil Ankofski ~ 1964 CC#1 ~ ES #7 ~ RB #2 1968 ~ says:

    ~ some afternoon remembrances ~

    The hot dog slicing was an afternoon chore for the lone lineman
    working between the lunch and dinner rushes.
    Perhaps 1/3 of a box was prepped at a time.
    Phil A.

  • Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos (NM) says:

    Nostalgic: Herzlich Willkommen (pardon, I don’t remember the official language of Woody’s!!!). It is indeed refreshing to have some “youth” join in with remembrances/updates!!! (Alas, but given your sojourn was ’88-’91, I’m not sure 30ish years ago qualifies as anything akin to “Nostalgia” as many of us herein often might say “I remember just the other day (meaning e.g. ’96) when images began on the internet!!! (was it called Mosaic? Mozilla? or something _ _ _illa?…. i.e. adding to textual blatherings ala DOS!)

    Anyway! Tri-tip, T-Bone, New York!!!? Whoa! Rice Pilaf, but still no Green/Red Chile/Jalapeno/Salsa…LOL. BTW, as you have “veiled” yourself in a gender-neutral label: If you’re a Guy, what’s it like working with Gals on-the-line? Did ya still wear the checkered pants; shortsleeved white shirts with suspenders and a Tyrolean hat with a feather; and a 12 inch apron tied with plastic tubing protecting your pants? If U B a Gal, were you one of the first to break “the overhead grill greasetraps” (i.e….LOL…akin to The Glass Ceiling?) Did Y’all still have Condiment Bars? (Speaking of which, were there, i.e. given it is CA, a Condom Dispenser in the both Restrooms?) Were various newspapers still hanging on poles for Guests? A drive-up window? Did yaz have to wear latex/nonlatex gloves? Were you still allowed to (smash the meat) to create a flaming Flare-up to impress “someone” cute passing the Grill Glass?

  • Phil Ankofski ~ 1964 CC #1 ~ ES #7 ~ RB #2 1968 ~ says:

    ~ Following my own suggestion ~

    After my name, I followed with my hire date , then listed the
    stores I worked at in the correct order, and ended with my
    resignation date. It all should stay in place …… I hope.
    Phil A.

  • Nostalgic says:

    There was Bob that was GM at El Segundo in late 80’s, early 90’s? I wanna say his last name may have been Anderson as well??

  • Phil Ankofski says:

    ~ Woody’s V off to a robust start ….. very cool ! ~

    Mr. Nostalgic ,
    We are enjoying your comments and hope you can stick with us.
    I would like to suggest that you add a couple of words to your name in order
    to help us remember that your Woody’s tenure was farther down the road.
    Example : Nostalgic ( Post Ralph Wood , 1988 to 1991 )

    It is fun to learn about all the newer menu items which were brought about my the subsequent owner. You yourself worked in a much improved environment with new items like : FRENCH FRYS , beer , chicken breast, bacon , cole slaw , fresh onions and tomato slices. PLUS SATALITE TV !

    My point would be that our older readers see your descriptions about stuff we never worked with and might get confused and think ; WTF is he talking about …… we never had fries or beer !

    Please advise if you agree that this is a good way to go.
    Phil Ankofski

  • Phil Thomas says:

    Ah, just thought of something that might jog Bob’s memory of the hot dogs at Woody’s CC. I remember how we used to put them on a wooden chopping block and roll them with one hand while holding a knife at an angle, thus making a spiral slice along the side. You could do two or three at a time that way. It prevented them from curling up when grilled and they looked more attractive as well. What I can’t remember is if that was a job for the bun man (which I think it was) or the backup man. Although I performed that task many times, I don’t recall ever doing it while working the grill. I think we tried to just have a few ready to go that way all the time. Wonder if other restaurants followed the same procedure? Haven’t ordered a hot dog in years.

  • Phil Thomas says:

    Bob– Not only does my memory fail me at times, but my familiarity with many common references such as “Gaslight” and things streaming on Netflix go totally over my head. Fact is that I’ve never opted to have a cable or satellite connection so you might say that I’m living just a bit outside of the mainstream, haha. No TV viewing since I lived in Los Angeles twenty- years ago. Well, I actually do subscribe to Netflix, but it’s via the mail version. In any case, it sounds like you were referring to my mention of hot dogs and green sweet pickle relish. I’d forgotten exactly what the green relish was called and I thank Phil A. for getting it right. Yes, it was simply “green relish” as I now recall. And we most definitely did offer hot dogs. No Alpine variations there, however, just plain hot dogs. And yes, the tongs were also used for the Steak-a-Bobs. One reason hot dogs remain in my memory is partly due to another time I (and possibly others?) were strongly encouraged to stop referring to them as “Tube steaks.” It was probably just one of those passing slang phrases that teenagers would use sometimes, but I can understand how it might have sounded confusing or otherwise to customers if the grill man called out to the cashier that the “The king size and the tube steak will be right up.”

    You are also right, Phil A. about the whipped cream. I remember using it on the Alpine malts, but my mind was trying to fit it in there on the sundae bar as well. Oh, and am I remembering correctly that minestrone was the only soup offered other than clam chowder on Fridays?

  • Nostalgic says:

    This is a really interesting thread. I’m not sure what value my experiences and memory bring to the table here (considering you guys date back to the early days), but here goes….

    On the soup and salad topic, we had big cup type bowls with flat handles. Separate bowls for salad, and a small plate for large salads. Beets on the salad was a popular request.

    They also use to offer, potato salad, cole slaw and macaroni salad.

    Baked potato, French fries or rice (pilaf) were offered as a dinner side.

    Another dinner option included was the choice of soup or salad. The question itself “soup or salad ?”, seemed to offer up quite a bit of confusion. The customers would often reply “Super salad?”.

    I failed in my attempts in training people to ask the question slower, so I just started training people to say “Salad or Soup, sir?”. Haha.

    It really was quality food, good value for dinners too.

    Tri-Tip, Halibut, Chicken Breast, T-Bone, New York and the ever so popular Hamburger Steak special.

    I

  • Phil Ankofski says:

    ~ Woody’s #7 in El Segundo ~

    I thought I would list all of the names I remember from my tenure at El Segundo from July 1966 to March, 1967. If any of these surviving guys happen to discover this new site, be sure to drop in and say hello.

    Bob Anderson, Steve Dabbs, Les Simons, Rudy Bennett, Gill and Rick Hinajosa, Cliff Grubbs, Steve Claypool, Vern Buwalda, & Wendall Jackson.
    Deceased employees : Phil Hartman ( comedian ) , Garey Grubbs ( US Army ),
    and Stan Vossen ( US Army ).

    The names listed comprised about 40 % of the crew members and I wish I could remember more. All the guys were excellent coworkers and made this store such a pleasure to manage. Plus, the store was only 3 years old so there were no maintenance issues of any kind. I took a lot of naps after lunch.
    Phil A.

  • Nostalgic says:

    What a trip down memory lane. I stumbled across this blog by chance. I myself, worked at the El Segundo location 88 to 91. I was a teen in HS.

  • Phil Thomas says:

    Many of the terms used on the web, such as “thread,” still confuse me even though I’ve read the dictionary definition more than once. And some may have different meanings to different people. So, although it looks to me like part V here is intended to be a continuation of the conversation from part IV, perhaps “New thread” it’s intended to mean that the conversation should begin anew and go in a different direction? Please understand that whatever the intent is, I’ll respect it because I know I don’t always understand terms which, to most people, are generally agreed upon. As for the most recent discussion that was going on in part IV, the fact is that I had already shared just about all I could remember about the Smorgasburger in Culver City. But there were a few brief comments which I did intend to finish up with and which I’ll state below. However, if you’d prefer to begin this page with a completely clean slate and steer the conversation in a new direction, I’ll totally understand and you needn’t post any of this. :)

    Phil A– Sad though it was to hear that Don Steinkey’s effort to establish a restaurant on his own ended in closure after less than a year, I much appreciate your sharing that part of the history with us. Although I ended up spending almost the next thirty years working for Los Angeles County, I’ve always admired the courage and risks people like Don take when going into business for themselves. Regardless of the outcome, it’s something he can be proud of.

    Bob– Forgot to thank you for posting the link showing those stainless steel bowls. They are definitely the ones that were used for the condiments and yeah, I can sure remember the feel and sounds they made when handling them. And one last thing (from me, anyway) about the salad station where soup was also offered. You were trying to remember whether the soup was served in bowls or cups. I replied that I couldn’t remember. Ah, but now I’m recalling that we offered large salads in addition to the regular ones. And weren’t the large salads served in the same BOWLS that we used for the soup? Maybe you or someone can elaborate on that.

  • Evan Zang says:

    I am pleased to welcome all returning and new posters to the newest edition of Woody’s Smorgasburger V! Thank you Mark, and Phil, for keeping this site alive with “historical and hysterical” memories!

  • Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos (NM) says:

    Ok Phil T…. only because you’re an Admitted Fuzzy Minded SmorgAlum as I, I’m not going to question that you might be trying to ‘Gaslight’ us at times!!! (i.e. having recently watched Charles Boyer do it to Ingrid Bergman on Netflix! ((if truth be told, I always thought he was not a suave but kind of a smarmy guy!))). And my reference is? You said “green pickle relish” on the condiment bar as some Folks like to put it on Hot Dogs! While I agree, and think some Folks “require” it on Hot Dogs, I’m at a complete lose in remembering Hot Dogs on the grill! Ok…was there a roundbar along the frontside of the grill at Redondo over which a “mat/cloth” hung for e.g. wiping the grill? And might a pair of industrial tongs hung there? If so, that might be prove of Hot Dogs, but I’m thinking they were used to turn the Steak-ka-Bobs. Ok, if there was a dog offering, what was its Tyrolean name and were there varieties thereof?
    Ok tho….As some Folks liked sweet, green pickle relish on their burgers in days of yore, I’m 50-50 that there might have been a bowl on the Condiment Bar. LOL
    – Elsewise, did anyone eversay how much those “cartons” of milk weighed that had to be hefted into its refrig unit? Regardless, did anyone else feel squimish cutting off the…for lack of a better word…tubing?

  • Phil Ankofski says:

    ~ WOODY’S SMORGASBURGER # 5 ! ~

    Well, well ….. looks like I may be the first to inaugurate # V . Fantastic !!
    Not only that, but the 1,500 hundredth comment is just days from being posted. ( all combined Woody sites = 1,2,3,4, and the Woody Gallery )

    Now, for a little more help …….. ” the Rule of Eight “.
    There were 8 condiment bowls for the burger toppings .
    Listed in no particular order :
    Mustard ~ Catsup ~ Salsa ~ Onion ~ 1000 Island ~ Dill Chips ~ Sweet Relish, and the Chopped Peanuts.

    NO MAYO OR TOMATO SLICES during the Ralph Wood ownership. ( 56 to 72)
    A Romaine lettuce leaf was given out by the salad man upon request. No charge. This was extremely rare.

    YES, there was Whipped Cream !!! It was only used to top off the Alpine Malts. It was NOT available for the Sundae Bar. From Presto Foods , Inc.

    Saltine Crackers were given out with a soup order and with a large salad.
    There were no oyster crackers during the Ralph Wood ownership.
    Perhaps in the later years.

    That it for todays history lesson.
    Off to take Mary Ann out to her favorite chicken shack. ( Cane’s )
    For dinner I am broiling a boneless, thick cut Rib Eye with baked potato.

    Enjoy your Mothers Day gatherings.
    And ……. welcome to Woody’s # 5 !

    Phil Ankofski

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